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Review: Dictador Amber 100 Month Aged Rum

Posted by Arctic Wolf on March 15, 2016

rum_amber_100Dictador is produced in Colombia on the Caribbean coast at Cartagena de Indias City. Rather than being produced from molasses, the rum is produced from the virgin honey of sugar cane. Interestingly, the choice of the distillery to use sugar cane honey rather than molasses is based upon a peculiarity of Colombian government policy. It seems that the country has mandated that automobiles in Colombia must use a certain percentage of biofuels in conjunction with gasoline as their fuel source. As molasses is the most readily available source of biofuel, almost all molasses produced in Columbia is earmarked for biofuel production. This means that the folks at Dictador Rum have little choice but to produce and use their own sugar cane honey for rum production.

Recently Dictador released what they call their 100 Month Series which includes four new rums all aged for 100 months. Unlike the more premium Dictador Solero Aged Rums, the 100 month series is meant to be a gateway series consisting of spirits which are meant to be embraced both as entry-level sipping rums as well as cocktail spirits.

The Dictador Amber 100 Month Aged rum is the flagship of the series. It is a continuous column still rum which was aged in ex-bourbon oak barrels. The final rum is said to be decanted by gravity to preserve its rich colour, and then bottled at 40 % alcohol by volume.

Here is a link to my full review:

Review: Dictador Amber 100 Month Aged Rum

“… The breezes above the glass reveal a nice mixture of oak and butterscotch with spicy accents of cinnamon, orange peel, and tobacco. Fine oak spices build up just a little, and soon vanilla and other baking spices (allspice, cloves and nutmeg) have joined in. The rum is pleasant to nose …”

Please enjoy my latest rum review.

Chimo!

 

 

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2 Responses to “Review: Dictador Amber 100 Month Aged Rum”

  1. Lance R. said

    Just out of curiosity, can you confirm that this is *not* a solera?

    • Hi Lance

      The information sent to me, and taken from Dictador’s website indicates the rum is 100 % column distilled and aged for 100 months in ex-bourbon oak barrels. In discussing the rum with Hernán Parra A (The Dictador Master Blender) when he was in Edmonton, there was no indication at all that this was a ‘solera’ rum. I do recall some discussion regarding keeping the barrels topped up during the aging process by consolidation to minimize the angel’s share, but blending of rums of different ages during the maturation process was never indicated. There may be some blending of older rums with younger rums after aging is finished to reach the right flavour profile; however that is common with all age stated rums and not part of a solera process.

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